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    Expressive Concepts, 1806 Oak Grove Drive, New Albany, Indiana 47150
     

customer service tips

Kelly J. Watkins,

author of over 100 articles

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"Tips for Dealing with

Upset Customers"

Tips to Maintain a Positive Attitude

By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA

  1. Keep your life in perspective.  Before you blow your stack, ask yourself, “Is this really that important?”  Compare it to the things that truly matter in your life.  Don’t let the pesky little things upset you.

  2. Let go of the negative.  When you hear yourself saying negative things about yourself (or other people or situations) - STOP!  Don’t waste your time and energy.

  3. You can’t always control what happens to you.  But, you can control how you react.  You’re in control of your emotions.  

  4. No one makes you mad.  You choose to get mad, or sad, or happy.  So, don’t choose to get mad at customers.  Instead, choose to have a positive attitude.

  5. Moods are contagious.  What attitude are you conveying?  Are you “infecting” others with good or bad moods? 

  6. Avoid negative people.  Don't let them infect you.  Instead, surround yourself with positive people.

For Reprints, please include contact info: By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA. Kelly offers Keynotes and Communication Training. For FREE tips, visit: www.keepcustomers.com or (812)246-2424.

 

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Tips to Improve Listening Skills

By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA

  1. Remove the guess work.  In order to persuade someone (to buy something or to do something), you need to tell the person “what’s in it for him/her.”  The best way to find out what a person wants is to listen.

  2. Identify listening situations.  Listening is hard work, and you can’t do it well 24 hours a day.  So, recognize situations when you should be paying attention.

  3. Focus on the message.  Pay attention to what the speaker is trying to say, not how it is said (too eloquent, too dull, too flowery, or too monotone).

  4. Avoid distractions.  Remove items that keep you from focusing on the speaker. 

  5. If you can't remove the distractions, then move yourself.  For example, turn away from the window or leave the hallway.

For Reprints, please include contact info: By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA. Kelly offers Keynotes and Communication Training. For FREE tips, visit: www.keepcustomers.com or (812)246-2424.

 

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Tips to Create the Right Mindset About Complaints

By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA

  1. It’s cheaper to solve the problem.  It costs six times more to obtain a new customer than it does to retain the current one. (Recent surveys say it can cost up to ten times more!)

  2. Realize complaints are good.  Only 4% of upset customers complain.  The other 96% simply leave and never come back.  A complaint gives you the opportunity to resolve the situation.

  3. The customer is always . . . the customer.  Don’t say to yourself “the customer is right.”  That implies you are wrong.  Instead, remind yourself that this person is a valued customer, and you need to do whatever it takes to satisfy him/her.

For Reprints, please include contact info: By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA. Kelly offers Keynotes and Communication Training. For FREE tips, visit: www.keepcustomers.com or (812)246-2424.

 

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Tips for Dealing with Upset Customers

By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA

  1. Don’t solve the problem right away.  What?!?! 

  2. The customer’s initial objective is to “vent” and express emotion.  Listen first, then offer solutions.  If you interrupt too soon, the person won’t be ready to listen or to accept your resolutions.

  3. If you can't resolve the customer's complaint, volunteer to get someone who can.  Don't wait for the customer to get angrier and demand to see the manager.

  4. Offer alternatives.  Instead of saying, “This is the only thing I can do,” try saying, “Here are two options.”  The customer may not be thrilled with the selections, but at least he/she gets to make the choice.

For Reprints, please include contact info: By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA. Kelly offers Keynotes and Communication Training. For FREE tips, visit: www.keepcustomers.com or (812)246-2424.

 

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Tips for Giving Employee Feedback

 

By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA

 

  1. Give feedback immediately after the occurrence.  If it was good, you want the employee to remember what he/she did right.  If it was wrong, you don’t want to give the person time to “forget” or make excuses.

  2. Criticize in private.  Employees listen better if their co-workers aren’t walking by.

  3. Don’t dwell on the negative.  Briefly tell the employee what he/she did wrong.  Then move on.  Spend your time discussing solutions.

  4. Praise in public.  Let everyone hear you say nice things about employees.  This not only encourages others to do well, it lets them know that good behavior is expected.

Give For Reprints, please include contact info: By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA. Kelly offers Keynotes and Communication Training. For FREE tips, visit: www.keepcustomers.com or (812)246-2424.  

 

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Tips for Coaching Customer Service Employees

 

By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA

1.     1.  Coaching situations shouldn’t always be negative.  Don’t wait until an employee does something wrong to schedule a meeting or discussion.  Provide positive reinforcement by complimenting the good things.

2.     2.  Suggest alternatives.  Don’t say, “there is only one right way to do this—my way!”  If you can provide two or three different methods, then employees feel empowered because they're allowed to choose the best technique for themselves.

3.     3.  Ask for suggestions.  After telling employees what they did wrong, ask them for ideas on how the situation could’ve been handled better.  If employees think of the suggestions, they will remember them (and be more likely to use them in the future.)

. Fo For Reprints, please include contact info: By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA. Kelly offers Keynotes and Communication Training. For FREE tips, visit: www.keepcustomers.com or (812)246-2424.  

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Tips for Relieving Stress

 

By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA

  1. When all else fails . . . laugh. 

  2. Learn to laugh at yourself.  Be serious about your work, but don't take yourself too seriously.

  3. Learn to laugh at the things that happen to you.  Actively look for the humor in situations.

  4. Most upset customer situations are funny.  Say to yourself, "This will make a great story -- when I get over it!"  Allow yourself a few minutes to calm down and relax.  Then, focus on the funny.  Try to find something humorous about what occurred.

  5. Bonus:  laughing is good exercise.

For Reprints, please include contact info: By Kelly J. Watkins, MBA. Kelly offers Keynotes and Communication Training. For FREE tips, visit: www.keepcustomers.com or (812)246-2424.

 

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Expressive Concepts

1806 Oak Grove Drive  New Albany, IN 47150    

Phone: (812) 246-2424     Fax: (812) 246-5232    

Email: info@keepcustomers.com

                            © Copyright 2001 Kelly J. Watkins